Last edited by Migor
Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

3 edition of Statius" Thebaid. found in the catalog.

Statius" Thebaid.

Lennart HaМЉkanson

Statius" Thebaid.

Critical and exegetical remarks.

by Lennart HaМЉkanson

  • 208 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Gleerup in Lund .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Thebes (Greece)
    • Subjects:
    • Statius, P. Papinius,
    • Seven against Thebes (Greek mythology) in literature.,
    • Epic poetry, Latin -- History and criticism.,
    • Sibling rivalry in literature.,
    • Polyneices (Greek mythology),
    • Eteocles (Greek mythology),
    • Thebes (Greece) -- In literature.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      SeriesScripta minora Regiae Societatis Humaniorum Litterarum Lundensis ;, 1972/1973:1
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsAS284.A1 S37 1972/1973:1, PA6697.A44 S37 1972/1973:1
      The Physical Object
      Pagination91 p.
      Number of Pages91
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5088306M
      ISBN 10914002752X
      LC Control Number74159668

      Thebaid, Books book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Statius published his Thebaid in the last decade of the first century /5. Loeb: Statius, Vol. II: Thebaid V-XII; Achilleid by Statius; J. H. Mozley, trans. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at.

      In the analysis of the epic’s structure, special attention has been paid to Statius’ debt to Virgil. A study of Book 1 has demonstrated that the first three hundred lines establish the Thebaid ’s Virgilian pedigree in a series of remarkable structural similarities and transpositions; the rest of the book then fans out to embrace a wide. A classical epic of fratricide and war, the Thebaid retells the legendary conflict between the sons of Oedipus Polynices and Eteocles for control of the city of Thebes. The Latin poet Statius reworks a familiar story from Greek myth, dramatized long before by Aeschylus in his tragedy Seven against s chose his subject well: the Rome of his day, ruled by th4/5.

      Other editions containing works of Statius [Publius Papinius Statius] Statius: Silvae IV. Ed. Kathleen M. Coleman () Oxford Classical Texts: P. Papini Stati: Silvae. Ed. Edward Courtney () Statius: Thebaid IX. Ed. Michael Dewar () Statius: Thebaid. Eds A. D. Melville and D. W. T. Vessey () Statius: Silvae 5. Ed. Bruce Gibson. In the eighth book of Statius' Thebaid the Argives meet to appoint a successor to the dead seer Amphiaraus ( ff.). Their choice falls on Thiodamas son of Melampus (–9); he, however, is overwhelmed by the prospect, which he regards with a mixture of joy and apprehension (–5).


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Statius" Thebaid by Lennart HaМЉkanson Download PDF EPUB FB2

PUBLIUS PAPINIUS STATIUS was a Roman poet who flourished in the late C1st A.D. during the reign of the Emperor Domitian. He was the author of a collection of dedicatory poems known as the Silvae, the epic Thebaid in twelve books, and the unfinished last two works relate the stories of the Seven Against Thebes and the youth of Achilles respectively.

THEBAID BOOK 2, TRANSLATED BY J. MOZLEY [1] Meanwhile the winged son of Maia returns from the cold shades, fulfilling the errand of great Jove; on every side sluggish clouds hinder his way and misty air enfolds him, no Zephyrs wafted his course, but the foul vapours of the silent world.

Statius: Thebaid. A new complete downloadable English translation of his epic of the Seven Against Thebes. thebaid book 7, translated by j.

mozley [1] As thus they tarried at the outset of the Tyrian war, Jupiter turned on the Pelasgians his wrathful gaze and shook his head, at the movement of which the high stars tremble and Atlas cries that his shoulders’ burden is increased.

THEBAID BOOK 8, TRANSLATED BY J. MOZLEY [1] When on a sudden the prophet fell among the pallid shades, and burst into the homes of death and the mysteries of the deep-sunken realm, and affrighted the ghosts with his armed corpse, all were filled with horror and marvelled at the weapons and horses and the body still undecayed upon the Stygian shores: for no fires had whelmed his limbs, nor.

Statius: Thebaid (Books ). Achilleid | John Henry Mozley | download | B–OK. Download books for free. Find books. Statius was raised in the Greek cultural milieu of the Bay of Naples, and his Greek literary education is reflected in his poetry.

The political realities of Rome in the first century are also evident in the Thebaid, in representations of authoritarian power and the drive for domination. Bibiliographic reference Statius. Thebaid, Volume II: Thebaid: Books Achilleid. Edited and translated by D.

Shackleton Bailey. Loeb Classical Library   The Thebaid, a Latin epic in twelve books by Statius (c. 45–96 C. E.) reexamines events following the abdication of Oedipus, focusing on the civil war between the brothers Eteocles, King of Thebes, and Polynices, who comes at the head of an army from Argos to claim his share of royal by: 6.

THEBAID BOOK 3, TRANSLATED BY J. MOZLEY [1] But not to the perfidious lord of the Aonian palace comes the repose of slumber in the twilight hours, although for the dank stars long travail yet remain till dawn; in his mind care holds vigil and wreaks the penalty for his plotted crime; then fear, gloomiest of augurs in perplexity, broods deeply.

PVBLIVS PAPINIVS STATIVS (c. 45 – 96 A.D.) THEBAID. Liber Primus: Liber Secundus: Liber Tertius: Liber Quartus: Liber Quintus: Liber Sextus. Statius published his Thebaid in the last decade of the first century. This epic recounting the struggle between the two sons of Oedipus for the kingship of Thebes is his masterpiece, a stirring exploration of the passions of civil war.4/5(7).

out of 5 stars The first seven of twelves books for Statius' "Thebaid" Reviewed in the United States on July 7, Publius Papinius Statius is the sort of Latin writer who is known only to devout classical scholars and students of Dante/5(4).

Composed at the end of the first century CE, Statius' Thebaid recounts the civil war in Thebes between the two sons of Oedipus, Polynices and Eteocles, and the horrific events that take place on the battlefield.

Its author, the Roman poet Statius, employed a wide variety of Greco-Roman sources in order to narrate the Argive expedition against Thebes and the fratricidal war. Statius, Thebaid 2 Edited with an Introduction, Translation, and Commentary Edited by Kyle Gervais.

Represents the first full-length English language commentary on Book 2 of Statius' Thebaid Juxtaposes the newly edited full Latin text with an accessible translation and extensive contextualizing introduction. Statius has in mind the Virgilian "nox atra caput circumvolat" Aen.

vi (cf, also Hor. 58), but here it is the "saeva dies " that hovers round. but to beat on the earth was a recognized way of summoning infernal deities. A critical study of Statius' Thebaid, Dr Vessey combats the common notion that the Thebaid is simply an exercise in anachronism, an episodic narrative of the Theban saga.

He shows that the poem can and indeed must be read as an elaborate and sustained allegory of the emotions - a study in the extremes of human behaviour/5(4).

Statius published his Thebaid in the last decade of the first century. This epic recounting the struggle between the two sons of Oedipus for the kingship of Thebes is his masterpiece, a stirring exploration of the passions of civil war.

The extant portion of his unfinished AchilleidPrice: $ Greek literary education and Roman political reality are evident in the poetry of Statius (c. CE). His Silvae are thirty-two occasional poems. His masterpiece, the epic Thebaid, recounts the struggle for kingship between the two sons of Oedipus.

The extant portion. My Thebaid on whom for twelve years I’ve spent all my waking effort, Will you survive, and be read when your author is long gone. Already, In truth, your fame has spread a generous path before you, and begun To reveal you, a new arrival, to those to come.

Already magnanimous. This is the third and final book in the Statius volumes of the Loeb Classical Library. Volume I contained the "Silvae," thirty-two occasional poems (circa A.D.), Volume II had the first seven of twelve books of his masterpiece, "Thebaid," while Volume III has the final five books and the incomplete "Achilleid," a charming account of the 4/5.

As for the other material in the book - the introduction is decent, and shows the translator's background in comparative literature; aside from descriptions of Statius' life and times, most of it is devoted to comparing the Thebaid to other works, such as the Aeneid and the Divine Comedy (Ross' interest in Statius' connections with Dante is Cited by: 5.Statius completed one epic, the book Thebaid, but only two books of another, the Achilleid.

The Thebaid, a more ambitious work, describes the struggle of the brothers Polyneices and Eteocles for the throne of the ancient Greek city of Thebes. It has many features borrowed from Virgil, but suffers from overstatement and work begins and ends, however, with passages that.